All posts tagged: chinese food

Juicy Bao

Anywhere we travel it’s impossible to miss Chinese food. And in between the sandwiches and steaks, we were in for some noodles and dumplings. Juicy Bao was recommended to us by a local friend, and it made for the perfect lunch spot while we window-shopped around Chinatown in downtown Melbourne. Because it was a late lunch, we decided not to over-order and stick to a few varieties: the signature steamed pork xiao long bao, pan-fried bao, pork and prawn wontons, minced pork noodles, and some stir fried Chinese broccoli. My favorite was the noodle dish, chewy and perfectly savory with some crunch from the greens. And of course, mixed in with a generous spoonful of chili oil. As for the baos, they were decent, with the exception of my little bao-juice-trickling-down-my-sleeve hiccup. But I have no one but myself to blame. Afterwards we continued our stroll around downtown, as our eyes roamed for a little something sweet. Pork and Prawn Wonton in Peanut, Chili, and Spicy Sauce Shanghai Noodles in Spring Onion Oil with Minced …

The Scrumptious Loco Moco, Hong Kong Style

We like to keep our food promises. When we say we’d come back, you can bet on it we will. At our first visit last year, I thought to myself, this place is definitely worth a revisit. And boy, was I right! I don’t know about you, but when I travel, I go for places that are inconspicuous, places that aren’t loaded with people who look like me (tourist). We arrived for an early lunch when the place was empty, so we had the whole restaurant to ourselves (I don’t know why this is worth mentioning; it’s probably not). The owner, an affable middle-aged lady who did the waiting, cooking, and serving, spoke to us in proper Mandarin, gracefully taking our orders and smiling. Not surprisingly, we didn’t need much time to decide on our order: 1 bowl of wonton noodle soup, an extra bowl of wonton, a plate of green veggies, 1 spam and egg with rice, and my very own: 2 orders of 2 Loco Moco’s! Each item cost in the range of HKD …

Rush Hour: Americanized Chinese Food Delivered Straight to your Door!

So, listen. We know you’ve been enduring and patient, as have we. And today, I declare us all free of the dolor of nostalgia we have had to suffer through all this time. A Panda Express clone, the King of American Chinese food (or what my dad would call “fake Chinese food”), is finally within reach here in Jakarta! My favorites (which I suspect are yours too): Crab Rangoon, General Tso’s Chicken, Kung Pao Chicken, and let’s be honest, any combination of orange plus some kind of meat meat, or lemon plus some kind of meat, are mine (and yours) to devour. Simply call Rush Hour and you’ll be on your way to scarfing down a mixed bag of comfort grub we know you have so dearly missed, as have we. On my recent trip to Shanghai, I stopped by Cha’s Restaurant for a delicious feast of what we considered Americanized Chinese food. And although Cha’s serves the gourmet kind, we’re happy Rush Hour delivers the non-gourmet kind, perfectly packaged in back-to-basic white paper boxes. Crab Rangoon | …

Craving Americanized Chinese? Come to Cha’s Restaurant

I love Chinese food. As a family, we eat it on a regular basis. But equally, I love Americanized Chinese food. Think Panda Express and the like. Think General Tso’s Chicken. Walnut Shrimp. Crab Rangoon. Egg Drop Soup. Simple, comfort food that’s sure to fill me up. Or what my Dad would call “fake Chinese food.” Alas, since I don’t live in the US anymore, not every day can be orange chicken day and egg foo young day. Needless to say, cravings are a part of my daily life. And while I haven’t found a worthy equivalent of Americanized Chinese in Jakarta, Cha’s in Shanghai was sufficing. Seeing the restaurant packed with mostly youngsters, and having to wait in line for about 10 minutes, we couldn’t wait to have a taste! Pineapple Bun with Sliced Butter | 8 RMB We opened with a little something sweet and warm: the Pineapple Bun with sliced Butter (you absolutely cannot go wrong with this pairing) – perfect to enjoy with some hot milk tea: Cha’s Milk Tea (Hot) | 16 RMB The …

Shengjian at De Xing Guan: A Shanghai Must-Eat

Yesterday’s Xiao Long Bao was rewarding. Today, we were eager to have another bite. But instead, we found an equally mouthwatering treat: Shengjian Bao (生煎包), a Shanghainese breakfast favorite. Shengjian is a small, panfried and steamed bun filled with pork and gelatin that melts into a soup when cooked. Among the soft top, savory and juicy middle, and crunchy bottom, it’s no surprise that this little delicacy is a commonly loved breakfast item among Shanghainese. Can I say that it’s also become mine? We just couldn’t help ourselves. Another round of xiao long bao? Why not? And although these ones were decent, yesterday’s at Lao Sheng Chang remained our winner. And of course, the mandatory noodle soup… The shengjian is decidedly one of my absolute favorite breakfast food in Shanghai. And while cha siu bao, xiao long bao, and other dim sum tidbits are easily available in Jakarta and all over the world, one would not find shengjian just anywhere. And boy have we landed in the right place! Since we didn’t get to take home our xiao …

For a Solid Xiao Long Bao, Come to Lao Sheng Chang

Shanghai is known for many things. Chief among them: Xiao Long Bao! And even though most shophouses may claim to serve the best xiao long bao, being discerning eaters, we know better, right? This soup-filled steamed bun is so delicate, I will say the making of it is an art. Or at least demanding a remarkable skill only few have mastered. Early this morning, our taste made no complaints whatsoever. How could they? Lao Shang Cheng’s xiao long bao was solid! Lao Sheng Chang was just a few minutes away from our hotel. Strangely, the first thing that caught my eyes was the busy staircase written with menu items. Be careful not to get too engrossed – watch for your steps! Champignons on a Fish Noodles  | 19 RMB Yukina the Braised Pork Noodles | 18 RMB Soup Bun with Pork and Salted Egg Yolk | 18 RMB/4 Going crazy over noodles! It’s interesting to observe that noodle soups in Shanghai and many parts of China are cooked with a milder broth, compared to those in Jakarta. I never worried about something being too salty, which I …

Eat with Noodles Flying over Your Head at Hai Di Lao Hot Pot

Not a prank or gag. Just a stunt (and we suspect a little mischief) on the part of the noodle whisperers at Hai Di Lao. Hai Di Lao is no ordinary hot pot restaurant. In fact, it’s no ordinary restaurant. Really, it’s no ordinary place. I can’t think of another restaurant where you can eat with noodles flying over your head. Or get a manicure and pedicure while waiting in line. Get this: waiting tables are converted into game tables. And enjoy some milk tea while you’re at it. Your kids throwing a temper? Let them throw their temper at the kids’ playground. Heading for the washroom? Feel free to take your time and enjoy its amenities including a toothbrush, toothpaste, toothpicks, cotton buds, mouthwash, hand lotion, hair ties, bobby pins, hairspray…oh the few gazillion little things women need. And don’t be surprised when your personal washroom butler stands right next to you at the sink to pump your soap, hand you a towel, and squeeze a dollop of hand lotion to make sure your hands have just the …

Kopi Es Tak Kie

There’s nothing like waking up early on a Sunday to enjoy breakfast the traditional way, the way our parents, grandparents, and great grandparents have. If you want something beyond scrambled eggs and toast, come and enjoy what I’d call a real breakfast–one that’s worth waking up early on a Sunday morning for. Tak Kie, established at least more than 70 years ago, is a traditional and humble restaurant in the Pancoran area. That being said, there’s nothing humble about the food they serve. When you’re here, two must-haves are the pork noodles (bakmi babi) and chicken rice with mixed pork (nasi ayam campur babi). And while you’re at it, have some iced coffee to go with them. Pi Oh  Another must-try turtle soup, perhaps one of the best in town. Nasi Ayam Babi Campur Chicken rice with mixed pork. Bakmi Babi Noodles with minced pork. –One of the best in town, on par with another of my favorite: Bakmi Babi Sido Laris. Remember to add some chili sauce for an extra kick. And in the back is a fried pork …

Soup Restaurant

Do not be alarmed or turned off by the name. I, too, assumed Soup Restaurant served only soup. But it turned out to be a Chinese restaurant offering, yes, soup, among others, as well as other bites you’d find at other similar joints. You’ll find this chain restaurant in several spots around Jakarta, and all over Singapore and Malaysia. Overall, the food was decent, although I have to mention they are quite MSG-generous (from what it tasted like) while the portions are modest.  One other dish I’d recommend (picture not shown here) is the claypot beef rice which reminded me of the Thai beef basil rice, just not as spicy. When ordering your tea, feel free to ask for a blend of two kinds of teas. We had the pu-er mixed with oolong – just for a little something extra. Enjoy! Selada Saus Tiram | 40K Fried Lettuce with oyster sauce. Tahu Claypot | 38K Claypot tofu (using Japanese tofu). Mee Suah Goreng Penang | 45K Penang fried mee suah with egg, bean sprouts, chicken, and mushroom. Ayam Jahe Ala Samsui | 90K (Small) 180 …

Delicious Kitchen

Hong Kong–a haven for many things, but for our purposes: food (what else?). Delicious Kitchen was recommended to me by some friends who raved about its famed “Pai Gu Fan,” or pork ribs over rice. What could go wrong with pork and rice? Most of the time, nothing. But does the restaurant live up to its name? We shall see. Located in the hustling Causeway Bay area, this mid-sized restaurant serves up Chinese favorites including a variety of noodle and rice dishes. Every dish we had I would recommend. For starters, the hot and sour wonton soup, particularly the wonton (stuffed generously with a mix of pork meat and veggies), was amply savoury. The noodle soups tasted different (in a good way) from what I’m usually used to–also tasty (I’d recommend in particular the “dan dan mian” or “tan tan” noodles). Chicken, ham, and shrimps noodle soup ($43) Fried intestines with a hot sauce Chinese cabbage with shredded scallop Lettuce with garlic “Tan tan” Noodles ($29) Hot and Sour Wonton Soup ($43) And finally, we’re drawing near to the …